passing

Today, we’re relaxing a la grandiose. We spent the afternoon at the Scandinave, soaking in hot tubs and relaxing in saunas while the sky dumped buckets and buckets of snow on us. It was delightful. Now we’re snuggled in at the Fairmount, and we’re watching the Olympics, and we ordered room service. Oh la la! Tomorrow we’ll be on the slopes.

I’ve been thinking a lot today about passing. Passing as healthy, that is. I went bald at the spa. I soaked in the hot water and the snowflakes fell on my head and melted right away, and my pate was cold. I didn’t pass. That’s why some women wear wigs, but not to the spa. They wear same wig everyday, wigs that look like their hair. Any dumbass should be able to figure out I don’t have hair. I mean, I wear a different wig everyday. And sometimes I wear a purple wig. Come on, dudes. If you can’t put two and two together I probably need to find smarter friends. Kidding. Sort of. Last week, a colleague who doesn’t know (well, I haven’t told her explicitly) that I have cancer saw my wig, different than the wigs I’ve worn on the last two days I’ve bumped into her, and asked, “Is this a performance?” I shrugged. I don’t know what it is. I wear wigs, too, but I today I recognized that act as explicitly not about passing. It’s a lavish, extravagant not-passing. Maybe it’s a performance. I kind of like thinking about it as a performance.

I don’t want to pass. I don’t want to go around telling you, “I have cancer,” but obviously¬† I’m not healthy, and despite the advice from “Look Good, Feel Better,” which could be more aptly named, “Try to Look Normal, Make Everyone Else Feel Better,” I don’t have an insane desire to fool the world. I don’t care if people wonder. It’s fucked. Maybe if people wonder they’ll do something. My wigs- and this weekend on the slopes, my hats- are an extravagant not-passing.

I mean, sometimes I worry. Like I wore the long platinum wig to the bank, and the teller who goes to my yoga studio asked “how I got my hair like that.” I shrugged. Then I worried if I would have to wear only the long platinum wig to the bank, so she wouldn’t ask more, and I wouldn’t have to provide cancer-explanation about why my hair was blonde, then red, then purple, then short. Then I worried she’d find me out, see me bald at yoga and think I lied to her. And then I stopped for a second to think about if I cared if this girl thought I lied to her? Nope. Besides, I didn’t lie. I just didn’t explain. Explaining, educating, it’s exhausting. Often it leads to me consoling the other person, and hello folks, I’m the one with cancer. So, no, I don’t care. She’ll see me at yoga eventually. Who cares.

I don’t want to pass as something I’m not. It doesn’t seem fair to me, in fact it seems cruel, to ask me to participate in becoming who I’m not. It seems cruel because it denies my reality, it denies the horror and the fear and the madness. Cancer is real. It’s real in young people. My baldness is that realness. My body is invaded. It forces you to think about walking around, healthy, and it forces us all to think about the privilege of health, and to think about plastics and pesticides and health care. It’s brilliantly, horrifically, real. I hope.

So no, I’m not interested in passing.

I’m interested in playing. I’m interested in performance. I’m interested in real.

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One thought on “passing

  1. Pingback: too tired again – leiomorph

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