R/O Mets

I’m scrolling through my phone. Who do I want to know about this? I get to Z, and I don’t want to tell anyone.

I do a search for “cancer.” Ashley, Samantha, Catherine, Tasha, Aimee, Kara, Kristina. They all have cancer after their names, in my phone. Maybe I’m Chelsey Cancer to them too. I pick two. I send out a text. They respond.

No one else knows.

We were walking the seawall. I doubled over in pain, the throbbing radiating out of my sternum. And then it was gone, and I was normal, walking, talking, breathing. I rubbed the bone just under my skin in the center of my chest, the place with no muscle to pad it, the place where my ribs come together. Here, and then not. Painful, and then normal. Weird.

I was doing rabbit pose. I pulled my heels, and then the pain flooded through my chest and I uncurled with a velocity totally unacceptable in yoga. I laid on my back. And then it was gone. I did the next set, and felt just as I did two postures prior. Normal.

Chatting on the phone. I had to stop and breathe. Not too deeply, for that would make the throbbing worse. I pretended to take another call. And sooner than I could have taken a message, the pain dissipated and I went right back to giggle chatterbox.

I emailed our family doc. I don’t really know how to know if this is some normal random thing, or something I should come in for. I’ve had this for a long while now, since the chemo. My oncologist did a PET scan last summer, and it was not cancer making my sternum ache. It was not cancer. She said whether I came or not was up to me, but that I could definitely drop in and she would see me, and I could come in whenever. How are you feeling? I was surprised at how much a doctor could care. I made an appointment. She is sending me off for an X-ray. If you didn’t have a history of breast cancer, I’d send you home. X-Rays are scary enough as it is, since I’m fairly certain my scoliosis X-Rays are what caused my cancer in the first place.

The requisition form reads: acute onset of sternal pain with radiation hx of left breast cancer, on tamoxifen. r/o mets.

R/O METS.

METS.

We are ruling out mets. Mets, in cancer-speak, is short for metastatic cancer. Metastatic breast cancer is what kills. We are ruling out mets, and I have to remind myself we’ve already ruled out mets. Nothing has changed since the PET scan for the same symptoms, last summer. It’s gonna be fine….

I don’t want to tell anyone. No one. I don’t want anyone to worry. I don’t want to see eyeballs fill with tears. I don’t want the pity. I don’t want the swearing. I don’t want the worry. I don’t want advice. I don’t want you to relate. I don’t want anything.

I want to stand next to the ones who know. Who know inside their bodies what it feels like, the ones who have bodies warped by scars and who are riddled with plastic forms holding space where there was once tissue, the ones who know that feeling that feels like a belly full of ice cold water rising up into their chest.

I don’t want to be on the outside of this fishbowl called life, peering in. I don’t want to be on the inside, everyone else peering down into my fishbowl that is void except for my fear.

This is life. Life after cancer. Worry for the future. It is a good day to write a worry on a paper scrap, and roll it up inside my worry doll’s little worry pocket, so that she can take care of that worry that is so real, and so that I can focus on the present. At present, I know nothing except that I’m probably fine. At present, I know I have a long to-do list and a 4:15 yoga class. At present, I know I love Sam and we have great surprises and adventures on the road ahead. At present, I know if I call on them, my people will show up with buckets of love. At present, I know I have to get through this, on my own. On my own, with constant cancer-friend texting.

And maybe with The Song, if I can bear to hear her sing “I think I’ve got everything under control, it’s gonna be fine, it’s gonna be fine” when I feel so wildly out of control, when I’m unsure if indeed, it’s gonna be fine.

And so I scroll through my phone. I still don’t know who to tell. So I guess I’ll blog about it, and then everyone will know. After all, being a bad-ass is about honesty, isn’t it? It’s not about shutting everything inside, it’s not about no-feeling, it’s not about risking it. It’s about drawing the contours of what happened, of what hurts, of how it changed, and being a bad-ass is about making enough space by telling my own story that in the end, others have enough space to tell theirs, too, be it filled with hurt or tears or hope or anger or laughter. Isn’t that what I wished for, the other day, when I attended the Callanish film screening? It is, and I believe we have a responsibility to make this world the way we need it, the way we need it to survive. And so today, I’m doing that. I’m telling. This is what I need. It’s gonna be fine….